Two-Eyed Seeing and the Indigenous Perspective

Join us on Friday, May 13, starting at 7:30 PM EDT, as we welcome Montreal RASC amateur astronomer Karim Jaffer will give a presentation on “Two-Eyed Seeing and the Indigenous Perspective“.


Karim has been the Public Events Coordinator for the RASC Montreal Centre since 2016, helping re-establish the I.K.Williamson Astronomy Library and coordinating both public events and outreach activities throughout the Montreal area, cultivating partnerships with the Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium, the Institute for Research on Exoplanets (iREx), the Cosmodome, AstroRadio.Earth, Student Astronomy clubs from other post-secondary institutions, and many local amateur astronomy groups. Karim is a member of the RASC National Education and Public Outreach Committee, an Explore Alliance Ambassador, and has recently joined the Lowbrows Astronomical Society and the Astronomical League.

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May 2022 Event Horizon Newsletter

The latest issue of the Hamilton Amateur Astronomers Event Horizon newsletter is now available for download!

In this issue you’ll find…

  • HAA Explorers
  • The Sky This Month for May 2022
  • What’s Up in Awards? May-June 2022
  • The Search for Life on Mars, Part 1
  • Making The Best Of It
  • NASA Night Sky Notes
  • Eye Candy
  • Plus More

Download the latest issue or visit the newsletters section for past issues.

Photo credit: M81 and M82 galaxies, by Michel Audette

April 2022 Event Horizon Newsletter

The latest issue of the Hamilton Amateur Astronomers Event Horizon newsletter is now available for download!

In this issue you’ll find…

  • HAA Explorers
  • The Sky This Month for April 2022
  • What’s Up in Awards? April-May 2022
  • NASA Night Sky Notes
  • Eye Candy
  • Plus More

Download the latest issue or visit the newsletters section for past issues.

Photo credit: The Masthead Photo is of the Gibbous Moon, by Bernie Venasse:

Observing the Moon for Beginners

Join us on Friday, April 8th, starting at 7:30 PM EDT, as we welcome Pittsburgh Pennsylvania amateur astronomer Larry McHenry, who will give a presentation on “Observing the Moon for Beginners”, an introduction to our nearest neighbor in the Solar System. 

Larry McHenry has been active in amateur astronomy for over 40 years, and is a member of the Kiski Astronomers, and the Oil Region Astronomical Society (ORAS) in Southwestern Pennsylvania. You can learn more about Larry’s astronomical interests online at his webportal: http://www.stellar-journeys.org/.

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March 2022 Event Horizon Newsletter

The latest issue of the Hamilton Amateur Astronomers Event Horizon newsletter is now available for download!

In this issue you’ll find…

  • HAA Explorers
  • The Sky This Month for March 2022
  • What’s Up in Awards? March-April 2022
  • An Astronomical Romance
  • Earth Grazing Eclipses – I
  • Universal Complexity – Part 2
  • NASA Night Sky Notes
  • Plus More

Download the latest issue or visit the newsletters section for past issues.

Photo credit: Fox Fur and Cone Nebulas in Monoceros, by Rich and Rosemary Kelsch

Goal Oriented Observing

How do you get the most of a night under the stars? How do you make sure you never run out of things to explore? If you’re looking to broaden your stargazing experience, having a specific set of goals is the way to go. That’s why so many astronomical organizations have observing programs. In this talk on Friday March 11 at 7:30 PM, author and astronomer John A. Read will discuss three programs, common among these organizations: Explore the Universe, Explore the Moon, and the Messier objects. He’s written several books with the goal of simplifying the stargazing experience. 110 Things to See with a Telescope, 50 Things to See on the Moon, and Learn To Stargaze – No Telescope Required (coming summer 2022). With the use of these simple guides, you’ll be accomplishing your stargazing goals before you know it.

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February Members Meeting

Join us online this Friday February 11 at 7:30 PM EST as we feature several fantastic guest speakers on our agenda!

We have our very own Jo Ann Salci and John Gauvreau with John Hlynialuk of the Bluewater Astronomical Society speaking about their ‘Love of Astronomy’ moments as well as Brett Tatton speaking about his Bowling Ball Telescope. You won’t want to miss out!

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February 2022 Event Horizon Newsletter

The latest issue of the Hamilton Amateur Astronomers Event Horizon newsletter is now available for download!

In this issue you’ll find…

  • HAA Explorers
  • The Sky This Month for February 2022
  • What’s Up in Awards? February-March 2022
  • Confirmation of the First Exo-Moon
  • Universal Complexity
  • NASA Night Sky Notes
  • Plus More

Download the latest issue or visit the newsletters section for past issues.

Photo credit: Globular cluster M13, by Peter Wolsley

Peek-a-boo: The Value of Astronomical Occultations

Peek-a-boo: The Value of Astronomical Occultations

Join us online this Friday January 14 at 7:30 PM EST as we welcome Dr. Paul Delaney and his presentation “Peek-a-boo: The Value of Astronomical Occultations”.

As amateur astronomers, there are countless ways that your observations are invaluable to the pursuit if our understanding of the universe. Planetary and stellar occultations can provide us with insights into orbital parameters, dimensions and thus object shape, the presence of rings and atmospheres, etc. This talk will highlight some of the more famous occultation observations of the past while revealing how just a little time and effort can be both scientifically rewarding and personally very satisfying.

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January 2022 Event Horizon Newsletter

The latest issue of the Hamilton Amateur Astronomers Event Horizon newsletter is now available for download!

In this issue you’ll find…

  • HAA Explorers
  • The Sky This Month for January 2022
  • What’s Up in Awards, January 2022
  • NASA Night Sky Notes
  • 2020-2021 Financial Statements
  • Plus More

Download the latest issue or visit the newsletters section for past issues.

Photo credit: Milky Way dust clouds in Aquila, by Bob Christmas