View the 2017 Solar Eclipse with the Hamilton Amateur Astronomers

On Monday August 21, 2017 a partial solar eclipse will be visible from Hamilton and surrounding areas. This is a wonderful opportunity to see a rare and spectacular natural event. The eclipse will last over 2½ hours, changing in appearance throughout that time, with the greatest amount of the Sun being eclipsed at 2:31 pm. At that time about 76% of the Sun will be blocked.

The Event

This illustration shows the relative positions of the Sun and the Moon during the time of maximum eclipse, at 2:31pm.

The Moon, shown here as a black disc, will pass in front of the Sun from our perspective. When this happens it is called a solar eclipse. the Moon is 400 times smaller than the Sun but it is also 400 times closer, so they appear about the same size in the sky.

The Sun will first appear to have a small “bite” taken out of its right hand side a little after 1:09pm. This blocked part of the Sun will appear to grow as the Moon covers more and more of the Sun, until finally at 2:31pm it will appear like the illustration. From then until the eclipse ends the blocked portion of the Sun will shrink as the Sun regains its normal appearance, ending with the last silhouetted part of the Moon disappearing from he left and side of the Sun at 3:39pm.

Time

The Hamilton Amateur Astronomers will be at T.B. McQuestion Park between 12:00 – 4:00pm for the whole event. The eclipse itself will occur at the following times:

  • Begins: Mon, Aug 21, 2017 at 1:09 pm
  • Maximum: Mon, Aug 21, 2017 at 2:31 pm
  • Ends: Mon, Aug 21, 2017 at 3:49 pm
  • Duration: 2 hours, 40 minutes
  • When to view

Location

T.B.McQuesten Park
1199 Upper Wentworth St.
Hamilton @ 12:30 – 4:00pm
Subject to weather conditions.

Solar Viewing Glasses

Solar eclipse glasses available at this event but please note that glasses are limited and on a first-come, first-served basis.

Important Safety Note

Looking directly at the sun can cause permanent eye damage or blindness. Extreme caution must always be taken. Always use adequate eye protection such as eclipse glasses designed for such a purpose. Do not use homemade filters such as exposed photographic film, smoked glass or welding goggles. With commonly available eclipse glasses this spectacular event can be viewed safely and enjoyed by the whole family.

Further Details

Food Share Donations

Donations of non-perishable food for the Hamilton Food Share program will be collected at this event. All donations are gratefully accepted and thanks to your generosity we’ve collected thousands of pounds of food since we began. Let’s keep up the great work as the need continues.

 

Photo Credit: Partial Solar Eclipse 2014, John Gauvreau

5 Comments

Jack Bennett says:

The eclipse was really an exciting event! Many people don’t realize but we’re so lucky that this full eclipse of the sun happened in our lifetime. – Jack

Dan says:

Would you recommend a pinhole camera box as a safe alternative to solar eclipse glasses? Its an indirect view off a screen.

Ron Shields says:

I understand that your group is having an eclipse event at T.B. McQuesten Park between 12:00 – 4:00 pm on the afternoon of August 21st. Would it be O.K. if I could join you that afternoon? I live in the area. I have in my possession an 8″ Nexstar Evolution SCT with solar filter and a Coronado Solar Telescope, of which I am willing to set up at your event. Let me know if I could join in the festivities with my equipment.

Cheryl says:

Hi There:

Just wondering if you have to be a member to come look at the Solar Eclipse? And also if not are we able to purchase glasses as well?

    This is a public outreach event where we share the love of astronomy with anyone interested. You do not need to be a member for this event so please join us. There should be solar glasses available at no cost at this event but please be aware that they’re on a first come, first served basis.

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